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Lunchtime LaboratoryMore Videos

Presenter: Lisa Mann, RN, BSN, MA

The second installment of the new LUNCHTIME LABORATORY webinar series is on August 5, 2014 at 12:00pm PDT.

The world of Parkinson’s disease medications can be complex to navigate, but it doesn’t need to be a mystery!  In this webinar, Lisa Mann, RN, BSN, MA, will shed light the pitfalls and barriers to tapping in to the best possible management of symptoms. Learn critical information and practical strategies that you can use while working with your doctor to achieve your best possible benefit and quality of life.  This program will include information about timing, identifying intended therapeutic effect and side effects for common anti-Parkinson medications, and what you can do to be proactive in managing your medications and treatment plan.  

The following link will allow you to register for this free program. You will receive an automatic reminder as the event nears. The reminder email will provide you with the link to join the webinar or you can return here to join.

Register here!

If this is your first webinar with us, please plan to join the webinar at least 15 minutes before the webinar start time.  This will allow time for your computer to download the software add-on in your browser.

Bio: Lisa Mann, RN, BSN, MA, is the Education Director and Team Care Coordinator for the OHSU Parkinson Center. She is responsible for a wide range of patient care and community outreach activities. Her position includes managing the movement disorders clinic, providing integrated support to persons with Parkinson’s and their families, and developing and implementing community education and outreach programs to enhance patient, family, and community understanding of Parkinson’s disease. She is an expert in forming and sustaining comprehensive multidisciplinary care teams. 

Brought to you by 
Northwest Parkinson's Foundation & Parkinson's Resources of Oregon

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PD Community BlogRead Blog

Take a Hint from PD

Tuesday June 24, 2014

It’s March, 2000. I’m lost in the Spandex of the Tour of Anchorage pre-race crowd. I gawk at all the super-fit athletes around me and try to reassure myself I’m prepared to cross-country ski 50 kilometers through the middle of town. As our pod of racers starts, I notice that they seem to be pulling ahead of me. It’s as if an invisible force is gently but inexorably drawing them forward. Or is it holding me back? Later as I chug up to an aide station, a woman watches with concern, and asks if I’m alright. No problem. I’m fine. Why would she even wonder?

I struggled on to finish hours later, blissfully unaware that in a little more than a year I will be diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease.

One of the hallmarks of Parkinson’s disease is slowness. Not just the slowness of the patient, but also the snail-like progression of the disease in most people. Of course, that is a good thing. With a disorder’s description includes progressive, disabling, and incurable, you don’t want to see words like rapid, swift,or sudden.

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Taking the Park out of Parkinson's

Friday June 06, 2014

Last Saturday, over twenty people met at the Columbia City Library in Seattle for our new PD University's inaugural event, "What to Expect When You’re Diagnosed with Parkinson’s." Dr. Pinky Agarwal, of Booth Gardner Parkinson’s Care Center at EvergreenHealth in Kirkland, WA., spoke to the group about what to expect five, ten and twenty years after being diagnosed with Parkinson’s.

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Weekly eNews UpdateMore News

Scientists Find 6 New Genetic Risk Factors for Parkinson's Disease

Sunday July 27, 2014

Using data from over 18,000 patients, scientists have identified more than two dozen genetic risk factors involved in Parkinson's disease, including six that had not been previously reported. The study, published in Nature Genetics, was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and led by scientists working in NIH laboratories.

"Unraveling the genetic underpinnings of Parkinson's is vital to understanding the multiple mechanisms involved in this complex disease, and hopefully, may one day lead to effective therapies," said Andrew Singleton, Ph.D., a scientist at the NIH's National Institute on Aging (NIA) and senior author of the study.

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Anti-inflammatory Drug Can Prevent Neuron Loss in Parkinson's Model

Friday July 25, 2014

An experimental anti-inflammatory drug can protect vulnerable neurons and reduce motor deficits in a rat model of Parkinson's disease, researchers at Emory University School of Medicine have shown.

The results were published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease.

The findings demonstrate that the drug, called XPro1595, can reach the brain at sufficient levels and have beneficial effects when administered by subcutaneous injection, like an insulin shot. Previous studies of XPro1595 in animals tested more invasive modes of delivery, such as direct injection into the brain.

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The Parkinson PostMore Issues

Spring 2014 Parkinson's Post

In this Issue:

  • Before There Was H.O.P.E. He Found Hope
  • Move. Connect. Engage.
  • A Soft Voice in a Noisy World
  • PD Link Northwest
  • A Conversation with My Dad
  • Tribute Gifts
Read this Issue (pdf)

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