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Creating pomegranate drug to stem Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

Friday August 22, 2014

Research will look to produce compound derivatives of punicalagin for a drug that would treat neuro-inflammation and slow down the progression of Alzheimer's disease, scientists report. The onset of Alzheimer's disease can be slowed and some of its symptoms curbed by a natural compound that is found in pomegranate. Also, the painful inflammation that accompanies illnesses such as rheumatoid arthritis and Parkinson's disease could be reduced, according to the findings of the two-year project.

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Parkinson's Disease Patients Fight for Best Possible Life

Thursday August 21, 2014

A diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is devastating and brings with it a steep learning curve. If climbed, patients say, life can be good.

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A Co-Occurring Cruelty: Parkinson's and Depression

Wednesday August 20, 2014

The complex interplay of Parkinson’s and depression calls for unique coping skills.

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Forbes on Parkinson's

Monday August 18, 2014

“The majority of people with Parkinson’s are walking around without telling anyone,” he told NBC News. “You only see the small fraction who are not doing well. And people identify them with the disease.”

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10 Parkinson's Signals

Monday August 18, 2014

There are many symptoms associated with Parkinson's disease. The symptoms listed below could be signs of Parkinson's disease. A single symptom may not be enough to establish Parkinson's disease. You should, however, make an appointment with your doctor if you exhibit more than one of these symptoms.

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New Device Will Help Monitor Parkinson's Patients

Thursday August 14, 2014

Parkinson's disease is like a rolling wave of ever-changing symptoms, not a lightning strike of different events, says its most famous patient, the actor Michael J. Fox.

So when doctors ask for a list of recent symptoms, they miss a lot of the subtleties of the progressive disease.

Hoping to change that, the Michael J. Fox Foundation and Intel announced Wednesday that they are collaborating on a project to track Parkinson's patients 24/7.

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Scientists Report Successfully Implanting Brain Cells in Mice

Monday August 04, 2014

Sci­en­tists say they have suc­cess­fully im­planted brain cells in­to mice, rais­ing hope for fu­ture ther­a­pies that would re­place cells in pa­tients with Parkin­son’s dis­ease, for ex­am­ple.

The re­search­ers at the Uni­vers­ity of Lux­em­bourg re­ported that they im­planted neu­rons, brain cells that car­ry nerve im­pulses. These cells were “re­pro­grammed” from what were orig­i­nally the mice’s own skin cells.

The im­plants were “suc­cess­ful, be­cause last­ingly sta­ble,” the sci­en­tists re­ported, pub­lish­ing their find­ings in the cur­rent is­sue of the jour­nal Stem Cell Re­ports.

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Parkinson’s Drug Trial Has Researchers Optimistic

Thursday July 31, 2014

Results of a Phase I clinical trial of what could be the first vaccine for Parkinson’s disease has experts cautiously optimistic. Those results were released Thursday by the maker of the drug and the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Disease.

Many drugs can make movement easier or alleviate other symptoms of the disease. But no drug has been shown to effectively slow or stop the progression.

The drug being tested is known as PD01A, made by AFFiRiS AG, an Austria-based biotech company. It is supposed to stimulate the body’s immune system to produce antibodies that bind to the protein alpha-synuclein, clearing it from the brain and slowing disease progression.

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Austrian Biotech Firm's Parkinson's Vaccine

Wednesday July 30, 2014

An Austrian company has developed a potentially viable vaccine for early-stage Parkinson's disease. The treatment, which is designed to slow or even stop progression of the disease, has undergone a Phase I clinical trial, from which data was released on Thursday in New York.

The treatment is based on a candidate vaccine known as PD01A, which lowers levels of alpha-synuclein. This is a brain protein which is believed to play an important role in maintaining a supply of synaptic vesicles in presynaptic terminals, as well as helping to regulate the release of dopamine, a type of neurotransmitter that is critical for controlling the start and stop of voluntary and involuntary movements.

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Naltrexone May Diminish Impulse Control Disorders in Parkinson's Disease Patients

Wednesday July 30, 2014

Up to 20 percent of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and their families may confront a common but largely unrecognized challenge: the occurrence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) such as compulsive gambling, sexual behavior, eating, or spending. Yet the presence of PD in these patients can severely limit or complicate treatment options. A team of investigators from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Parkinson's Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center (PADRECC) at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center conducted a pilot study and found that the opioid antagonist naltrexone may be an effective treatment for diminishing ICD symptoms in PD patients. The results were published in the journal Neurology.

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