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Filtered by: November 2005

New Resource on Parkinson’s Disease Now Available The First Year® Parkinson’s Disease Useful to Patients, Care Partner

Tuesday November 29, 2005

According to the Parkinson’s Action Network, a new case of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is diagnosed every nine minutes. This means that there are thousands of people who can benefit from reading Jackie Hunt Christensen’s new book, The First Year® Parkinson’s Disease, An Essential Guide for the Newly Diagnosed, released by Marlowe and Company in October.

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Your profession pre-disposes you to Parkinson’s

Tuesday November 29, 2005

Mayo Clinic researchers have found a relation between an individual’s education and career choices, and the risk of Parkinson’s disease in later life.

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Two Studies Look at Parkinson’s

Tuesday November 29, 2005

Two new studies are helping doctors better understand and treat Parkinson’s disease.

In the first study, researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, N.Y., looked at the incidence of Parkinson’s in various occupational groups and came up with a rather surprising finding: People with more education are more likely to develop the disease. The highest levels of Parkinson’s were observed among physicians, who arguably attend school longer than people in most other occupations. The lowest levels were seen in people with manual, labor-type jobs.

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ISU researcher helps fight Parkinson’s disease

Tuesday November 29, 2005

Anumantha Kanthasamy spent the early part of his career at the University of California at Irvine.

While there, he worked on creating compounds to protect the way the human brain produces dopamine, a chemical essential to the body’s function because it sends messages between nerve cells in the brain.

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LRRK2 protein linked to Parkinson’s disease

Tuesday November 29, 2005

Researchers at Johns Hopkins’ Institute for Cell Engineering ( ICE ) have discovered a protein that could be the best new target in the fight against Parkinson’s disease since the brain-damaging condition was first tied to loss of the brain chemical dopamine.

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Lower calorie consumption may reverse early-stage Parkinson’s disease

Tuesday November 22, 2005

A new Oregon Health & Science University and Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center study suggests that early-stage Parkinson’s disease patients who lower their calorie intake may boost levels of an essential brain chemical lost from the neurodegenerative disorder.

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Researchers identify new target in fight against Parkinson’s

Tuesday November 22, 2005

A new drug target for fighting Parkinson’s disease has been identified by researchers at Johns Hopkins’ Institute for Cell Engineering (ICE).

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On TV, Castro scoffs at claim he has Parkinson’s

Tuesday November 22, 2005

Rebutting reports he is suffering from Parkinson’s disease, Cuban President Fidel Castro told the nation in a televised speech ending early Friday that he is feeling "better than ever."

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MN Orchestra Violinist Fights Parkinson’s Disease

Tuesday November 22, 2005

Minneapolis Kristin Kemper is a world-class violinist who fulfilled a lifelong dream when she was hired by the Minnesota Orchestra.

Looking at her, you wouldn’t know she is dealing with a disease that causes tremors, stiffness and trouble with balance and coordination.

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Education link to rise in Parkinson’s risk

Tuesday November 22, 2005

PARKINSON’S disease is more likely to strike the highly-educated than manual workers, say researchers.

Scientists found people who had studied for nine years or longer had the highest risk of developing Parkinson’s, with physicians most at risk of contracting the debilitating condition. The researchers said it was possible that early Parkinson’s triggered a desire to spend a lot of time studying, rather than long periods of education increasing susceptibility to the condition.

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